Posts Tagged ‘life’

George Carlin – HBO On Location USC 1977 #freespeech


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Complete show. “On Location: George Carlin at USC” is Irish-American comedian George Carlin’s first ever HBO special, recorded during the Summer of 1977 at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. This unique taping lasted 85 minutes, and, at age 40, marked a new era in Carlin’s career. He explained to the audience that before this special came about, that he never did a show for home consumption or reproduction. To date he has recorded 12 shows for HBO, and is soon to record a 13th – 30 years after his first. In the process of planning this broadcast, the word spread quickly, and so much so that it resulted in a serious legal hearing at the Federal Communications Commission. Due to the controversy, Carlin sticks with more user-friendly material. However, a federal court of appeals ruled in Carlin’s favor and allowed him his right to free speech. This was mentioned during the opening of the program by Newsweek columnist and 60 Minutes reporter Shana Alexander (1925-2005), which explained that it is the kind of entertainment that was rarely seen or heard on cable or network television at the time.
Program
1. Intro & Warning (1:40)
2. Program Open (:36)
3. Interview on inspirations and censorship (2:22)
4. Taking The Stage (10:27)
5. Shopping (7:52)
6. Walking (3:59)
7. Dogs & Cats (9:27)
8. Old Folks & Kids (8:00)
9. Food (3:30)
10. The News (3:20)
11. Brand Names (2:44)
12. Perversion of Language (7:07)
13. Forbidden Words (22:24)
14. Closing Credits (1:47)

Why The Chemical Companies, Now Biotechnology Companies, Are Evil


The reasoning involved in the nature of the evil of chemical companies is not rocket science.  We only have to consider a few basic principles.  Once they are accepted as true, the rest follows.  The first principle is that life processes and systems are complex. They are the most complex systems known.  This makes all developing life sciences, especially those involved with the dysfunction and repair of life processes, as much an art as a science.  Those that would a create a product must also be able to maintain and repair it, not only the product, but also any consequence of its use. So the practice of  ‘making’  or modifying of  life must equate to the healing of life in its methods in order for it to be a moral enterprise. Those that would improve life must be able to heal it when things go awry. To confuse a practicing art with an applied science is to engage in fraud and quackery of the most unethical sort.

Before the chemical companies became biotechnology companies they only dealt with chemicals that interacted with life processes.  Repeatedly these companies produced new chemicals (thousands daily)  that  they had no way of knowing what the full long term effects would be on living systems.  They were released without sufficient study. I know this because the needed pre-release experiments would have involved the study of such long term high level multivariate interactions that it would have been impossible to do these experiments in principle (though some have theorized it was possible albeit too costly to perform such experiments in practice).  In actual practice the environment itself was the testing ground, and the lawyers and the public relations propagandists delayed the inevitable lawsuits until a profit could be turned, a subsidiary company divested and the inevitable move to another product accomplished.

This was bad enough when these harmful chemicals, which are now lodged in every living thing on earth, were the product of the chemical companies.  Now these same companies want you to believe that they are both competent and moral enough to patent life and license its product in combination with the same subsidiary chemicals that they released to the detriment of billions around the globe. If they couldn’t consider the interaction of molecules, in principle, then even the lowest forms of life must still be beyond their reach. Let us not even consider the human impact or higher order systems.

The only morality a corporation has is its profit.  Death is the golden skeleton that is cost of such companies doing business.  Such is the nature of evil. I am not saying profit is evil, but those that profit from death are evil incarnate.

The linkage I make of biotech with medicine is no shallow metaphor.  The ethical policy of these companies must have in it a ‘do no harm‘ provision. The researchers in these companies also must follow the tripartite role model of the physician as a clinician, public health expert and scientist. To date all we have seen is Doctor Josef Mengele.

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