Posts Tagged ‘philosophy’

The Inquisition of Climate Science: A Scientist Exposes the Business of Denial


Galileo faces the Roman Inquisition who, without evidence, demand he recant his statements on heliocentrism. by John Atcheson James Lawrence Powell’s The Inquisition of Climate Science is a straightforward, thorough and well-researched account of the assault on climate science. The book is scholarly, yet entertaining, as a quick review of the titles in the Table […]

by John Atcheson in Climate Progress

James Lawrence Powell’s The Inquisition of Climate Science is a straightforward, thorough and well-researched account of the assault on climate science.

The book is scholarly, yet entertaining, as a quick review of the titles in the Table of Contents reveals.  Among the best are:  “Toxic Tanks” (think tanks), “An Industry to Trust” (in which he contrasts the oil and gas companies’ and Insurance companies’ positions on global warming), “Climategate: Much Ado About Nothing” (in which he drives yet another wooden stake in the heart of this travesty and dispatches other “gates”).

Powell’s account is – pardon the pun – intelligently designed to thoroughly debunk the baseless dogma and diatribes coming out of the denier community. [more]

via The Inquisition of Climate Science: A Scientist Exposes the Business of Denial.

I have just one thought here on the above:

Note the difference between denial and skepticism.  The former is the dismissal of science, the latter is its heart.  The denial is really the denial of the diagnosis made by the doctors of science.  We can just ignore the problem as the denier would, however, most of us would rather take some form of treatment, no matter how painful.  

The skeptic may ask for a second opinion, especially on a terminal diagnosis.  Also, the skeptic might ultimately prefer an alternative medicine route, rather than a more conventional treatment.  However, even the skeptic in the face of evidence will often become a reasonable patient and look at all alternatives, and seek to use some combination of treatments which he trusts based on the evidence. The denier, if he never moves though anger and bargaining to acceptance, will just hope he is not wrong, rather than returning to a healthy skepticism and weighing the available options in the face of death. 

I am not saying that there is not bias (and money) on both sides of this argument.  I am saying that in the name of the precautionary principle we need to start doing what is good for a sustainable world.

Allen Ginsberg – Moloch #FuckYouWashington


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But I want to study philosophy.


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Thinking the Impossible: French Philosophy Since 1960 by Gary Gutting – review

The theories of Derrida and Foucault are revisited in this fair-minded history of French deconstructionism, and guess what? It wasn’t all bunkum… by Christopher Bray in The Observer, Sunday 20 March 2011 Article history

MICHEL FOUCAULT, PARIS - 1968

Michel Foucault: ‘coiling, arrhythmic stodge’. Photograph: Sipa Press / Rex Features

Are the theory wars over? Twenty-five years ago you couldn’t cocoa your cappuccino without someone accusing you of floating a signifier, much less close down the, ahem, discourse with a simple “I prefer my coffee that way”. Who is this mythic “I”, the theorists wanted to know, and how could he presume to know what he prefers? Has he forgotten he’s as fictional as Oliver Twist or Mrs Dalloway? Doesn’t he know that his likes and dislikes are as ideologically determined as the medium-term financial strategy?

  1. Thinking the Impossible: French Philosophy Since 1960 (Oxford History of Philosophy)
  2. by Gary Gutting
  3. Buy it from the Guardian bookshop

College life these days looks rather less fraught. Theory is on the curriculum, to be sure. But the position you take on it no longer has any connection with your place in the world. Talk about the textual topography of the soul can be handy for seminars on Wuthering Heights, but even the most radically decentred subject must pay back their student loan. So theory won – because nowadays everyone “does” it. But theory lost – because nobody now does any more than “do” it. Like feigning Leavisian aliveness to the felt textures of the organic community, theory has become just another one of those things you affect to believe in in order to make a grade.  [more]

Gary Gutting, Thinking the Impossible: French Philosophy Since 1960, The Oxford History of Philosophy, 978-0-19-922703-7 | Hardback | 10 March 2011

Link to publisher’s site

Review in The Observer

Description

  • Launches the Oxford History of Philosophy
  • The fascinating story of one of the most turbulent and fertile periods of philosophy
  • A vivid account of the social and cultural context
  • Offers Anglophone philosophers a fresh understanding of Foucault, Derrida, Deleuze, Levinas, and Badiou
  • A sympathetic but critical study of highly contentious thinkers
  • Relates contemporary French philosophy to the inspirational figures of Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre
  • This new series offers ground-breaking narrative history of philosophy for a broad readership in philosophy and history of ideas

The late 20th century saw a remarkable flourishing of philosophy in France. The work of French philosophers is wide ranging, historically informed, often reaching out beyond the boundaries of philosophy; they are public intellectuals, taken seriously as contributors to debates outside the academy. Gary Gutting tells the story of the development of a distinctively French philosophy in the last four decades of the 20th century. His aim is to arrive at an account of what it was to ‘do philosophy’ in France, what this sort of philosophizing was able to achieve, and how it differs from the analytic philosophy dominant in Anglophone countries. [more]

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Hitler finds out about his philosophy grad school applications


Vodpod videos no longer available.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Thinking the Impossible: French Philosophy Since 1960 by Gary Gutting – review

The theories of Derrida and Foucault are revisited in this fair-minded history of French deconstructionism, and guess what? It wasn’t all bunkum… by Christopher Bray in The Observer, Sunday 20 March 2011 Article history

MICHEL FOUCAULT, PARIS - 1968

Michel Foucault: ‘coiling, arrhythmic stodge’. Photograph: Sipa Press / Rex Features

Are the theory wars over? Twenty-five years ago you couldn’t cocoa your cappuccino without someone accusing you of floating a signifier, much less close down the, ahem, discourse with a simple “I prefer my coffee that way”. Who is this mythic “I”, the theorists wanted to know, and how could he presume to know what he prefers? Has he forgotten he’s as fictional as Oliver Twist or Mrs Dalloway? Doesn’t he know that his likes and dislikes are as ideologically determined as the medium-term financial strategy?

  1. Thinking the Impossible: French Philosophy Since 1960 (Oxford History of Philosophy)
  2. by Gary Gutting
  3. Buy it from the Guardian bookshop

College life these days looks rather less fraught. Theory is on the curriculum, to be sure. But the position you take on it no longer has any connection with your place in the world. Talk about the textual topography of the soul can be handy for seminars on Wuthering Heights, but even the most radically decentred subject must pay back their student loan. So theory won – because nowadays everyone “does” it. But theory lost – because nobody now does any more than “do” it. Like feigning Leavisian aliveness to the felt textures of the organic community, theory has become just another one of those things you affect to believe in in order to make a grade.  [more]

Gary Gutting, Thinking the Impossible: French Philosophy Since 1960, The Oxford History of Philosophy, 978-0-19-922703-7 | Hardback | 10 March 2011

Link to publisher’s site  Review in The Observer

Description

  • Launches the Oxford History of Philosophy
  • The fascinating story of one of the most turbulent and fertile periods of philosophy
  • A vivid account of the social and cultural context
  • Offers Anglophone philosophers a fresh understanding of Foucault, Derrida, Deleuze, Levinas, and Badiou
  • A sympathetic but critical study of highly contentious thinkers
  • Relates contemporary French philosophy to the inspirational figures of Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre
  • This new series offers ground-breaking narrative history of philosophy for a broad readership in philosophy and history of ideas

The late 20th century saw a remarkable flourishing of philosophy in France. The work of French philosophers is wide ranging, historically informed, often reaching out beyond the boundaries of philosophy; they are public intellectuals, taken seriously as contributors to debates outside the academy. Gary Gutting tells the story of the development of a distinctively French philosophy in the last four decades of the 20th century. His aim is to arrive at an account of what it was to ‘do philosophy’ in France, what this sort of philosophizing was able toachieve, and how it differs from the analytic philosophy dominant in Anglophone countries. [more]

POST STRUCTURALISM

From Blondie To Jung


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INTO THE MYSTIC WITH BLONDIE’S GARY VALENTINE: ROCK AND ROLL MEETS CARL JUNG, OUSPENSKY, AND MAGICK

Aristophanes Origin of Human Nature and Love


Aristophanes Origin of Human Nature and Love

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